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Ex-MotoGP Champ Hayden Checks Out Repaved Indy Course
Friday, August 05, 2011

This just in:

2006 MOTOGP WORLD CHAMPION NICKY HAYDEN
ASSESSES REFURBISHED IMS ROAD COURSE

INDIANAPOLIS, Friday, August 5, 2011 - American MotoGP rider and 2006 world champion Nicky Hayden was the first to check out the newly paved Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course Friday morning in preparation for the 2011 Red Bull Indianapolis GP, August 26-28 at IMS.

The fourth annual Red Bull Indianapolis GP will showcase the world's finest motorcycle racers including superstars Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo and Dani Pedrosa, along with American stars Colin Edwards and Ben Spies, who will soar through the IMS 16-turn road course at speeds up to 200 mph.

A three-time Moto GP race winner, Hayden won the 2006 MotoGP World Championship and has a career that includes six runner-up finishes, five pole positions and six fastest laps.

Known as the "Kentucky Kid", Hayden was born and lives in Owensboro, Ky., and considers the Indianapolis Motor Speedway his home track. In the three previous Red Bull Indianapolis GPs, Hayden finished as the runner-up in 2008, third in 2009 and sixth in 2010.

Hayden took a Ducati 1198 for a ride earlier this morning over the recently refurbished IMS road course. Beginning on June 9, 2011, crews repaved 1.5 miles of the circuit from Turn 5 through Turn 16. The existing asphalt was ground and then repaved with fresh asphalt to create a surface consistent with the other sections of the course. The FIM, the worldwide sanctioning body of motorcycling, inspected and approved the repaved section of the circuit July 7. The following is a Q&A with Nicky Hayden.

Q: Now that you've experienced the new IMS MotoGP road course surface, what do you think?

NICKY HAYDEN: The new surface is just what I expected, it's pretty much perfect. There are a couple corners that the riders requested to be redone and IMS went above and beyond, and actually the whole infield from Turn 5 to the finish is repaved, so I'm looking forward to getting back here on the race bike and laying some rubber down and cleaning up the racing line and trying it out.


Q: Will this increase competition or make it better for the riders, or both?

HAYDEN: I think it's safer, for one. There was a lot of crashing in the Turn 6 area over those bumps and I think it'll also make the racing better. It's going to open up a few areas where before it was one line because you had to miss the bumps, and now I think it'll make for better racing because there will be more places to pass. Just a more enjoyable, more fun track, so I know all the riders love Indy anyway and it's only going to make it better.

Q: Is there anything unique about this track compared to others?

HAYDEN: A lot. I mean look at the place, look at the size of it. It's pretty much the only track inside an oval like this. We race Motegi, which is part in an oval, but part outside. But definitely there's a heritage and a little bit of hype about Indy, a bit of swag, and this place has been around a long time and did a lot of racing. For me, being from Kentucky, it's the highlight of the year for me. I know a lot of guys really look forward to this one and it's a special race.

Q: Being from Kentucky, how important is this event to you?

HAYDEN: They're all important. The races in Italy are the team's home races, and Laguna Seca, also being in California, is cool, but to race three hours from home is something I never expected when I came to MotoGP. At that time there wasn't a race in America. The closest I got to home was Brazil, so I really cherish it. Every year I enjoy it more and more, and get more and more fans from home that have never really seen me race, or certainly never seen me race MotoGP. I get a lot of support. Owensboro is a great town that really gets behind their guys no matter what you're doing, and there are going to be a lot of people here from Owensboro for the race.

Q: Ducati is kind of like the Ferrari of motorcycles. What's it like racing for a team like Ducati?

HAYDEN: Like you say, Ferrari and Ducati kind of have that Italian swag, and it's a very unique bike, it's a very special bike with a lot of history. They just don't produce thousands and thousands of bikes. It's a small, small company that puts everything into their bikes and produce only road bikes, and I've learned a lot. The team is awesome. I mean, they love their bikes and love their team, and when you're in Italy you feel it. Everybody, from the people at the grocery store to the guys at the gas station, they're all behind you. This year hasn't been an easy year for us, but we know our bike is good and sometimes it's a little bit sharp, you get it outside that area that's the sweet spot and it makes for a long day, but when you get it on the sweet spot you know it's an absolute weapon. Hopefully when we come back here in three weeks we'll have it dialed in. We race the Czech Republic next and then we have a big test after the race, which is going to be really important for us to hopefully find something and get us teed up for a big weekend at Indy.

Q: You've got a great teammate (multiple time MotoGP world champion Valentino Rossi). How important is a good teammate in this series?

HAYDEN: I think we've got a good team. We're the only team with two world champions in it at the moment, so that's pretty unique in its own way and we still get along good. Me and him, obviously we want to beat each other, he's 16 points in front of me, I think, and it would be a big honor for me if I could beat him. He's won 11 titles over there and has pretty much set the standard for the last decade. It's been a different challenge for us because having an Italian world champion on the team has brought a lot of expectations and a lot of pressure, but the people there are still behind us, and of course they want results and want us winning, which we're not doing at the moment, which makes it hard. I've learned a lot from him, and also that goes both ways. This bike has been new to him and he's not above asking questions and wanting to know why, and I think right now the results haven't shown, but I think next year it's going to pay off when we come with the new rules and they go back to the thousand-ccs. I think having two strong teammates who are pushing in the same direction is going to be better instead of two guys wanting to go in different ways.

Q: Could you talk a little bit about how you as a rider can affect how your bike handles?

HAYDEN: The rider makes the biggest difference on a motorcycle, where in a car when you're strapped in with a seat belt on there's only so much you can do. On a motorcycle you have a lot more freedom to move around, use your body and different things to help make up for what the bike's maybe not doing. You can't ride a sled around here and think you're going to get on the podium on it, but a good bike, good team, good rider is all pretty even. It's not like you gotta have all three, but a rider can make that difference.

ENDS

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